Trump goes all in for making money off the deaths of babies

I guess once you’ve gone in for taking babies from their parents, you might as well go all in:

A resolution to encourage breast-feeding was expected to be approved quickly and easily by the hundreds of government delegates who gathered this spring in Geneva for the United Nations-affiliated World Health Assembly.
Based on decades of research, the resolution says that mother’s milk is healthiest for children and countries should strive to limit the inaccurate or misleading marketing of breast milk substitutes.
Then the United States delegation, embracing the interests of infant formula manufacturers, upended the deliberations.
American officials sought to water down the resolution by removing language that called on governments to “protect, promote and support breast-feeding” and another passage that called on policymakers to restrict the promotion of food products that many experts say can have deleterious effects on young children.

Making money by hurting the poor is a cliché, but not quite evil enough I guess:

The Americans were blunt: If Ecuador refused to drop the resolution, Washington would unleash punishing trade measures and withdraw crucial military aid. The Ecuadorean government quickly acquiesced.

I’m so proud to be from the US.

Trump wanted to go to war in Venezuala

Well, this is scary:

As a meeting last August in the Oval Office to discuss sanctions on Venezuela was concluding, President Donald Trump turned to his top aides and asked an unsettling question: With a fast unraveling Venezuela threatening regional security, why can’t the U.S. just simply invade the troubled country?

The suggestion stunned those present at the meeting, including U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and national security adviser H.R. McMaster, both of whom have since left the administration.

The next day, Aug. 11, Trump alarmed friends and foes alike with talk of a “military option” to remove Maduro from power.

But shortly afterward, he raised the issue with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, according to the U.S. official.

Then in September, on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly, Trump discussed it again, this time at greater length, in a private dinner with leaders from four Latin American allies that included Santos, the same three people said and Politico reported in February.

Trump probably believes the US would be greeted as liberators.

Trump administration is rolling coal

Here’s the Trump administration trolling the world again:

The Trump administration made its debut at a United Nations conference on climate change on Monday by giving a full-throated defense of fossil fuels and nuclear energy as answers to driving down global greenhouse gas emissions.

The forum — the only official appearance by the United States delegation during the annual two-week climate gathering of nearly 200 nations — illustrated how sharply the administration’s views are at odds with those of many key participants in the climate negotiations.

George D. Banks, special adviser to President Trump on international energy issues, led a panel with top American energy executives. “Without question, fossil fuels will continue to be used, and we would argue that it’s in the global interest to make sure when fossil fuels are used that they be as clean and efficient as possible,” Mr. Banks said. “This panel is controversial only if we chose to bury our heads in the sand.”

Here’s an interesting comeback:

Michael R. Bloomberg, the former New York mayor who has spent tens of millions of dollars on a campaign to shut down coal plants, said, “Promoting coal at a climate summit is like promoting tobacco at a cancer summit.”

The thing is, Donald Trump doesn’t recognize that. He is the king of political correctness, so if he thinks there’s no global warming then you’re not going to hear anybody from his administration talk about it and so you get comments like the one above by Mr. Banks.

Trump contradicts himself

During the campaign Donald Trump proclaimed that he was a friend to the LGBT community, but this still isn’t surprising:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has reversed a three-year-old Justice Department policy that protected transgender workers from discrimination under federal law.

In a memo to his US attorney offices and agency heads, Sessions said that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not protect transgender people from workplace discrimination by private employers and state and local governments.

‘‘Title VII’s prohibition on sex discrimination encompasses discrimination between men and women but does not encompass discrimination based on gender identity per se, including transgender status,’’ Sessions wrote in the memo dated Wednesday.

Trump lies all the time so you should never trust what he says and he has surrounded himself with cultural warriors (Pence, Sessions, …).

Republicans always claim that they are against abortion but won’t go against contraception. You can trust them about as much as you can trust Trump:

The Trump administration issued a rule Friday that sharply limits the Affordable Care Act’s contraception coverage mandate, a move that could mean many American women would no longer have access to birth control free of charge.

The new regulation, issued by the Health and Human Services Department, allows a much broader group of employers and insurers to exempt themselves from covering contraceptives such as birth control pills on religious or moral grounds. The decision, anticipated from the Trump administration for months, is the latest twist in a seesawing legal and ideological fight that has surrounded this aspect of the 2010 health-care law nearly from the start.

And then there’s foreign policy. North Korea is a mess, especially now that it has nuclear weapons, so it’s a great time to try to pull out of the treaty with Iran that has kept Iran from developing nuclear weapons:

But Trump, after twice certifying the deal, has warned his aides that he would not do so again. As a result, the administration is looking for ways to claim Iran is in violation of the “spirit” of the accord, even if it has complied with inspection criteria.The International Atomic Energy Agency has said that Iran was in compliance. When the agency has found minor violations, they have been quickly fixed.

This will indeed isolate a country but it might not be the US:

Britain, France, and Germany, all signatories to the agreement, are watching Trump’s deliberations with deepening concern. Diplomats from the three countries, as well as from the European Union, met with dozens of senators this week to warn them that if the United States withdrew, Europe would not follow.

Trump has no problem with being inconsistent:

The United States is poised to permanently lift sanctions on Sudan, US officials said on Thursday, recognizing the long-estranged country’s progress on human rights and counterterrorism after decades of war and abuses.

Sure, Sudan has done a lot more worse things than Iran but … Trump just doesn’t like Iran.

For fun (if you like worrying about nuclear war):

‘‘You guys know what this represents?’’ Trump asked. ‘‘Maybe it’s the calm before the storm. Could be the calm, the calm before the storm.’’

‘‘What storm Mr. President?’’ one reporter shouted. ISIS? North Korea? Iran?

‘‘You’ll find out,’’ the president said.

Finally, via Kevin Drum, let’s look back at that IRS scandal where they targeted the Tea Party groups. Here’s KD’s summary:

In total, the IRS audited 111 left-wing groups and 19 right-wing groups based on BOLO criteria. (It’s unclear how the “healthcare” category broke out between left and right.)

The vast majority were left-wing groups, but the IRS was being so unfair to the TEA Party groups.

Flooding in Asia

It’s not just Texas that is flooding, it’s also really bad in and near India:

At least 22 people were killed and dozens injured Thursday when a 117-year-old apartment building collapsed in a densely populated area of India’s financial capital following two days of torrential rains, hospital officials said.

Rescue workers in Mumbai combed through the wreckage of the five-story Hussaini building, which state officials had declared unsafe six years ago, but where about 40 people were living, according to residents.

Before you think of this as a third-world problem remember the fire in London and the explosions in Texas and its aftermath:

An unfolding crisis at a flooded chemical plant outside Houston on Thursday led to the prompt announcement of an investigation by a federal body that President Trump would eliminate.

The administration’s proposed budget would wind down funding for the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, a small, independent federal agency tasked with investigating chemical accidents.

The board, which has a budget of $11 million and 40 staff, played a major part in investigating the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and has conducted more than 130 investigations since its began operations in 1998. It originated as part of a set of 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act.

Good job President Trump. Anyway, it’s really bad in India:

The annual monsoon season from June to September routinely triggers floods, landslides and building collapses across South Asia, one of the world’s most densely populated regions, but this year’s rainfall has been among the deadliest in years.

The United Nations said last week that nearly 1,000 people had been killed and tens of thousands of homes, schools and businesses destroyed in India, Bangladesh and Nepal.

Feel free to donate for them also

Ruth Pfau

Now that I’m older, I look at the obituaries more often. Sometimes you run into ones like this:

Dr. Pfau, while not widely covered in the Western media, was renowned in Pakistan for her efforts to stop the spread of leprosy, a bacterial infection also called Hansen’s disease that when untreated can cause disfigurement and blindness. Around the world, its victims have often been relegated to “leper colonies” and regarded as outcasts.

The Express Tribune of Pakistan once credited Dr. Pfau with having “single-handedly . . . turned the tide of leprosy in Pakistan and won the gratitude and personal attentions of people ranging from military rulers to elected ministers to the general public.”

She has a couple great quotes:

But diverted to Pakistan while waiting for her visa in 1958, she was to stumble upon leprosy, a disease she had never heard of in a country she did not know existed.

“Well if it doesn’t hit you the first time, I don’t think it will ever hit you,” she recalled, after first seeing leprosy during a visit to a makeshift dispensary built on a disused graveyard in Karachi.

“Actually the first patient who really made me decide was a young Pathan.

“He must have been my age, I was at this time not yet 30, and he crawled on hands and feet into this dispensary, acting as if this was quite normal, as if someone has to crawl there through that slime and dirt on hands and feet, like a dog.”

and:

“Not all of us can prevent a war; but most of us can help ease sufferings — of the body and the soul.”

After helping Pakistan to become the first Asian country to have leprosy under control, she also:

She has also assisted the country’s many forgotten displaced people and rescued victims from the 2005 earthquake and floods of 2010.

Like Mother Teresa, she was a European nun working for decades among people with leprosy but she thought they weren’t all that similar:

She said her focus was on removing the root of the problem – not just dealing with its symptoms – the same ethos that has served her so well over the years in Pakistan when dealing with poor, displaced and marginalised people.

“The most important thing is that we give them their dignity back,” she insisted.

We need more people in the world like her.

Fuck

It seems North Korea might now have nuclear weapons small enough to put on rockets:

A report in The Washington Post on Tuesday went further. The newspaper said U.S. intelligence officials have assessed that a decade after North Korea’s first nuclear test explosion, Pyongyang has produced nuclear weapons for ballistic missile delivery, including by intercontinental missiles — the type capable of reaching the continental U.S.

Luckily we have a calm and rational person for our President:

‘‘North Korea had best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen,’’ Trump said during a briefing on opioid addiction at his golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey.

We are so fucked.

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