Renewable energy helps the economy

So Trump is taking the US out of the Paris agreement and still won’t say that he believes in global warming:

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt was asked the same question over and over and over again during a Friday briefing with reporters: Does President Trump still believe global warming is a hoax?

And each time, Pruitt refused to answer with a ‘‘yes’’ or a ‘‘no,’’ telling reporters that as he and the president discussed exiting the Paris climate deal, the topic of climate change never came up.

‘‘All the discussions that we had through the last several weeks have been focused on one singular issue: Is Paris good or not for this country?’’ Pruitt said when asked the question a first time. ‘‘That’s the discussions I’ve had with the president. So, that’s been my focus.’’

Trump has long been skeptical of climate change, despite vast scientific evidence showing that human activity has contributed to the problem, and has repeatedly suggested that it is a ‘‘hoax.’’ A Vox analysis found that Trump has tweeted such skepticism at least 115 times since 2011, describing global warming as ‘‘mythical,’’ ‘‘nonexistent,’’ ‘‘fictional,’’ an ‘‘expensive hoax’’ and ‘‘bulls—.’’

Let’s look at the economics:

Trump sees this move as a way to help stoke the nation’s coal industry. But coal’s importance is expected to dwindle anyway. New England’s largest coal plant, the Brayton Point complex in Somerset, closed for good this week. The main reason: It simply couldn’t compete with cheaper natural gas-fired plants.

Nearly 66,000 people work in the coal industry nationwide, compared to roughly 100,000 clean-energy jobs in Massachusetts alone.

Trump is already trying to take an ax to renewable energy programs. The president proposed a 69 percent cut to the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, which funds advances in everything from automobiles to wind power.

More troubling for Massachusetts: Trump proposed eliminating the “ARPA-E” program, which subsidizes high-tech energy research. Massachusetts has been the second largest beneficiary of ARPA-E grants after California, with more than $150 million flowing into the state since the program’s inception in 2009.

The US under Trump is reducing its funding for the part of the energy sector that is growing faster than any other. Maybe there’s still time to bring back the buggy whip industry.

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