Good news and bad news

It seems that Obamacare is doing exactly what we wanted it to do (I just take the first example):

The Hospital Corporation of America, which has facilities in 20 states, reported a big gap in Medicaid and uninsured admissions between expansion and non-expansion states. In the four states it operates where Medicaid expanded under the ACA, the company saw a 22.3 percent growth in Medicaid admissions, compared to a 1.3 percent decline in non-expansion states. The company also had a 29 percent decline in uninsured admissions in the expansion states, while non-expansion states experienced 5.9 percent growth in uninsured admissions, chief financial officer William Rutherford said.

Obamacare is reducing the number of patients that don’t have insurance which means the hospitals and states have to pay less (the hospitals, of course, pass the expenses onto the rest of us)–at least in states where Medicaid was expanded, now which would those be:

Of course, some Republican-led states have expanded their Medicaid programs. However, Republican governors run all but three of the 24 states that haven’t expanded Medicaid.

In really bad news, it seems sea level is going to rise quite a bit in the next couple centuries and there is no longer anything we can do about it (you can also look here):

And it’s not just one study:

In one of the new papers, a team led by Eric Rignot, a glaciologist at the University of California, Irvine, used satellite and air measurements to document an accelerating retreat over the past several decades of six glaciers draining into the Amundsen Sea region. And with updated mapping of the terrain beneath the ice sheet, the team was able to rule out the presence of any mountains or hills significant enough to slow the retreat.

Those six glaciers alone could cause the ocean to rise four feet as they disappear, Dr. Rignot said, possibly within a couple of centuries. He added that their disappearance will most likely destabilize other sectors of the ice sheet, so the ultimate rise could be triple that.

A separate team led by Ian Joughin of the University of Washington studied one of the most important glaciers, Thwaites, using sophisticated computer modeling, coupled with recent measurements of the ice flow. That team also found that a slow-motion collapse had become inevitable. Even if the warm water now eating away at the ice were to dissipate, it would be “too little, too late to stabilize the ice sheet,” Dr. Joughin said. “There’s no stabilization mechanism.”

Ah well, we don’t really need all that coastline–sorry Miami (among many others).

1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Good news and bad news | Gaia Gazette

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